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Letters to the editor: Sediment vs. dams

Sediment vs. dams

TO THE EDITOR

Maybe the problem for trout on the Kinni is mainly the sediment and not so much the dams. I couldn't help noticing how very, very brown and murky the river was on the north bridge on Main Street when the river was high and how clear it looked last week.

Instead of spending that astronomical amount to remove the dams, maybe the "Free the Kinni" people should focus on preventing so much topsoil flowing into the river in the first place. Perhaps work to have those setbacks along the river and more erosion control and also strong laws to prevent big manure spills (saw an article today about a Vernon County manure spill killing trout.)

Marilyn Owen

River Falls

Gullibility

TO THE EDITOR

Mexico will pay for the wall, China will pay for tariffs, both statements made by DT. But, the federal reserve and leading universities research states, the tariffs are costing the American taxpayers $3,000,000,000 per month.

DT is doing to the American taxpayers as he did with his foundation. Taking from everyone and giving it to the rich in his personal name, while deducting it as a donation.

The $3,000,000,000 per month costing the American taxpayers, because of the tariffs or tax, is to offset the tax break that was given to the rich. Russia and China are investing heavily into increasing agriculture development in their countries because of the instability of the U.S. markets. Once they have succeeded, the future for U.S. agriculture markets in those countries will be eliminated.

Trumpetter's gullibility, I would think and hope, would eventually reach its limit. As in the past, and as tension in the Mideast grows, young men will die to cover up old men's misdeeds to distract attention. As Abraham Lincoln once said, "America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves."

Tony Huppert

Spring Valley

That for which the Statue of Liberty stands

TO THE EDITOR

"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teaming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door." (Emma Lazarus)

These famous words on the Statue of Liberty's pedestal, though not present at the Statue's inauguration, have nevertheless been the symbol of all for which this country stands, open and welcome arms; the lamp of liberty. Freedom!

The new immigration policy announced by the President last Thursday is the antithesis of the words written by Lazarus. In his new Merit Immigration policy, Trump makes it clear that he has no compassion or empathy by choosing immigrants among the class of the skilled and educated rather than those who fit the words on the Statue, those seeking asylum. Trump also chooses skills over family, as those are the ones he believes deserve to immigrate to this country; he feels they can contribute more than those we now accept for asylum, those fleeing from poverty and violence.

No matter our different political or religious positions we have always been a nation of families. We care for our children, our parents, our elderly. Our lives are based around family ties no matter the distance between members. Trump wants to end "chain migration," not allowing immigrants to bring family members to join them here, thus separating their ties; yet he acted differently in the case of the first lady's family.

His policy of family separation, showing no empathy or understanding of the issues that brought these "homeless, tempest tossed" to our borders "yearning to breathe free," illustrates his total ignorance of the lives or situations of those who risk all to come to the land of which the Statue of Liberty is the symbol.

There is a Native American saying which says, never judge a man (or woman) until you have walked a mile in his or her moccasins. How can we, as a nation of family values of love, truth and justice, accept the separation of children from their parents in the brutal, abrupt way we watched on TV! If we look at our history, we have made other cruel and unjust mistakes, as the separation of Native American children from their families, culture and language so that they might forget their identity; the internment of Japanese Americans during the war, as well as slavery.

If only the skilled and educated can immigrate to this country, where will we find workers who now do the work that many Americans will not? There are other types of skilled workers; perhaps not college educated but as valuable to our economy and who merit the immigrant status.

Let us not make another terrible mistake in the history of our country, the land of the "free and the brave?" May our leaders show empathy, love and justice to help them to determine our actions!

Rev. Barbara de Souza

River Falls

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